Tag Archives: The Daintree Blockade

Interview with Bill Wilkie, author of The Daintree Blockade

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Last week I reviewed The Daintree Blockade: The Battle for Australia’s Tropical Rainforests. This week Bill Wilkie, the author of that excellent book, kindly took the time to answer some questions for me.

He’s also generously made a special offer to readers of this blog, Adventures in Biography. Details at the bottom of this post…

Bill grew up in Brisbane and studied sociology and Australian history at the University of Queensland. He has lived in London, Dublin and Sydney, and travelled throughout Europe, Asia and South America. Bill now lives in the small Queensland town of Mossman with his partner and their two daughters.

Bill was a participant in the ACT Writers Centre’s HARDCOPY 2015 program, which was where I first met him. (You can find a compilation of all my posts about the program here.) I found him to be friendly, supportive and quietly intelligent.

The Daintree Blockade is your first book – what sort of writing have you done up until now? Read the rest of this entry

Book Review: The Daintree Blockade by Bill Wilkie

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What does success look like to an environmental activist?

Sometimes success is obvious, like the protests against the Tasmanian Franklin Dam project. The protesters there were directly responsible for preventing the dam from being built and so protected a unique wilderness area.

But sometimes success is less obvious. A battle is lost but, in the end, a war is won. Such was the case for the Daintree Blockade of the early 1980s.

The Daintree rainforest of far north Queensland is every bit as unique and beautiful as the Tasmanian wilderness. But since the 1950s pressure had been rising to build a road through the Cape Tribulation National Park, and through some of the last remaining low land tropical rainforest in the country.

In 1983 the local council, in defiance of the parks authorities and the state government agency in charge of roads, decided to bulldoze Read the rest of this entry